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Critters and Varmints

critter

/ˈkrɪtər/

noun

1.  (US & Canadian) a dialect word for creature

— Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition

Having family in the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks, I’ve learned various “countryfied” words to add to my vocabulary.  Not that I actually use all of these words, but I do know a few funny ones such as:

  • “poke” (n. a sack or bag.  “Hand me that there poke and I’ll stick these taters in it fer ya so you can tote ’em home.”)
  • “sumpin” (n. something.  “Ma, I’m bored!  I need sumpin to do!”)
  • “ain’t”  (v. is not, are not, has not, have not…you get the idea.  “Ain’t you got supper ready yet?”)
  • “reckon” (v. think.  “You reckon we oughta head home?  It’s gettin’ purty late!”)
  • “feller” (n. a man.  “BillyBob?  Ain’t he that feller that bought BettySue’s old place down at Turkey Creek holler?”)
  • “purt-near” and “plumb” (adv. almost & adv. completely.  “I heard you was feelin’ puny.  You back to your old self yet?”  …  “Well, purt-near, but not plumb.”)

The list could go on for miles, but I’ll only mention one more one for you to enjoy:

varmint

[vahr-muh nt]
noun

Chiefly Southern and South Midland U.S.

  1. vermin.
  2. an objectionable or undesirable animal, usually predatory, as coyote or bobcat.

— Dictionary.com Unabridged (Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.)

Today I’d like to share recent photos of creatures that those in the Ozarks might label as “springtime critters and varmints“:

~~~~~POST SCRIPT~~~~~

After fencing in the garden to allow us to enjoy the bunnies AND fresh produce, I found out why she hung around the garden so often:  she had five babies hidden right in the center of my garden!  It’s crazy to me how wild rabbits make their nests in open areas; it makes me wonder how many I may have injured while using the riding mower in the yard.

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